Kitchen of the Week: A Bright Kitchen Addition with a “Pantry Portal” for a Narrow Townhouse in Brooklyn


The challenge: how to create a sense of light and space in a notably narrow late 19th-century townhouse? Located in Brooklyn’s Park Slope, the structure—with an interior width of 13.5 feet— was purchased by a young family of three who wanted to preserve the sequence of rooms. Equally importantly, they wanted a great-looking, central kitchen to replace the beat-up laminate design in the basement.

They found architects Anshu Bangia and Willam Agostinho on Remodelista. Members of the Remodelista Architect & Designer Directory known for their thoughtful, clean-lined work, the couple were hired to perform a top-to-bottom update. Not surprisingly, it’s their artful kitchen solution, an extension on the parlor floor, that the owners say is their favorite room in the house. Come take a look.

Photography by Nicole Franzen, courtesy of Bangia Agostinho.

The rooms are arranged enfilade: just beyond the front door, the living area opens to the dining room and a view of the new window wall in the kitchen addition. Openings between rooms were enlarged—carefully: &#8
Above: The rooms are arranged enfilade: just beyond the front door, the living area opens to the dining room and a view of the new window wall in the kitchen addition. Openings between rooms were enlarged—carefully: “the existing moldings were removed, repaired, and in some cases added onto to keep with the original detailing of the house,” says Agostinho.

The architects also created functional “transitional spaces” between living areas: “utilities and storage are located in these interstitial spaces,” explains Bangia. The architects worked with contractor Joe Litterello of Showcase Construction and Janik Furniture created all the millwork.

To separate the new .5-foot-wide kitchen and provide plenty of storage, Bangia and Agostinho designed a &#8
Above: To separate the new 10.5-foot-wide kitchen and provide plenty of storage, Bangia and Agostinho designed a “pantry portal” between the addition and the dining room. The fridge is concealed here (on the right side) as is the new HVAC system in the low ceiling. The owners opted for over-the-counter open shelving in the rest of the space to emphasize the natural light and view.



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