Steal This Look: A Grand Scale Double-Height Kitchen in Brooklyn


In an 1850s brick townhouse in Brooklyn’s Cobble Hill neighborhood, serial renovators Jean Lee and Tzu-Wei Lee called on architect Elizabeth Roberts to rethink the building, which had been divided intwo four apartments, as one. The biggest change? A three-story addition to the back of the building which now houses the fully custom double-height kitchen. The 1,200-square-foot space is inspired by modern Shaker design with an almost Seventies style twist. That’s thanks to beadboard-paneled cabinets, a reclaimed oak island, and a dark green retro range. Here’s a look at the sources and design details that nail down the distinct style.

 An oversized pendant above the island matches the grand quality of the double-height kitchen. (Oversized pendant lights are one of the loading=
Above: An oversized pendant above the island matches the grand quality of the double-height kitchen. (Oversized pendant lights are one of the 11 Interior Trends for 2019 we called out recently.) The reclaimed oak kitchen island is by Matt Hogan of Reliquary Studio in Woodstock, New York, and the reclaimed butcher-block counter is by Tri-Lox. Photography by Dustin Askland, courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts from Serial Remodelers Settle Down: A Brooklyn Townhouse Reinvention from Elizabeth Roberts.
A straight-on view of the custom colored range from Blue Star, a company that offers a wide range of powder coated colors. Countertop and backsplash are Vermont soapstone. Photography by Dustin Askland, courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts from Serial Remodelers Settle Down: A Brooklyn Townhouse Reinvention from Elizabeth Roberts.
Above: A straight-on view of the custom colored range from Blue Star, a company that offers a wide range of powder coated colors. Countertop and backsplash are Vermont soapstone. Photography by Dustin Askland, courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts from Serial Remodelers Settle Down: A Brooklyn Townhouse Reinvention from Elizabeth Roberts.
The beadboard-paneled cabinets are by also by Matt Hogan. The surrounding walls are done in tadelakt plaster by Stephen Balser of Art in Construction. Photography by Dustin Askland, courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts from Serial Remodelers Settle Down: A Brooklyn Townhouse Reinvention from Elizabeth Roberts.
Above: The beadboard-paneled cabinets are by also by Matt Hogan. The surrounding walls are done in tadelakt plaster by Stephen Balser of Art in Construction. Photography by Dustin Askland, courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts from Serial Remodelers Settle Down: A Brooklyn Townhouse Reinvention from Elizabeth Roberts.
 Above: The wood-burning fireplace, a regular fixture in Roberts’ kitchen designs, is made to be fitted with a pizza oven, Korean-style barbecue, and other inserts. Photography by Dustin Askland, courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts from Serial Remodelers Settle Down: A Brooklyn Townhouse Reinvention from Elizabeth Roberts.
Above: Above: The wood-burning fireplace, a regular fixture in Roberts’ kitchen designs, is made to be fitted with a pizza oven, Korean-style barbecue, and other inserts. Photography by Dustin Askland, courtesy of Elizabeth Roberts from Serial Remodelers Settle Down: A Brooklyn Townhouse Reinvention from Elizabeth Roberts.

Paint

For a warm white similar to that seen on the walls here, Benjamin Moore Steam is a shade of white both our editors and designers like Bright Design Lab have praised as &#8
Above: For a warm white similar to that seen on the walls here, Benjamin Moore Steam is a shade of white both our editors and designers like Bright Design Lab have praised as “a lovely warm white that reads as a very pure white in a space without turning cold.” For more see our post Architects’ 10 Favorite Warm White Paints.



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